The creepy eerie drawings ‘intact’ on Australia’s busiest sidewalks

Written by By Zoë Ruderman, CNN Toiling away on the broken pavement of a huge pedestrian plaza, Australia’s Liz Elwood stumbled upon a series of mysterious drawings. Perhaps, she thought, the artist, Doug Dumont,…

The creepy eerie drawings 'intact' on Australia's busiest sidewalks

Written by By Zoë Ruderman, CNN

Toiling away on the broken pavement of a huge pedestrian plaza, Australia’s Liz Elwood stumbled upon a series of mysterious drawings.

Perhaps, she thought, the artist, Doug Dumont, was drawing a wall?

Turns out it was much more revelatory: Dumont had drawn multiple lanes of walking, with each lane marking a doctor’s office and a shop front. Each brick enclosure could be either manned by a technician or by workers, who sat somewhere behind the wall as they were interviewed on camera.

His writing was meant to be seen from the curb. The sidewalks themselves were intentionally designed to be emptied by a few dozen cleaners twice a year.

Elwood, a pedestrian advocate, writer and television host, captured the bizarre drawings in a series of videos she called “Invisible.” They gained her more than 25,000 views, but also thrust her into the spotlight of conversations about sidewalk safety.

This is the second year in a row that she’s done something like this, Elwood said, and she would love to continue next year.

The city of Sydney has gone so far as to launch an initiative to address the growing cost of replacing the pavement every few years. Each person has access to a computer and connects to a program that updates their location, making it relatively easy to find and remove the dangerous bricks.

But there’s one obvious problem. Where to place a computer?

Leave a Comment