House approves bill that would fund US government for a decade

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The EPA “plagiarized” parts of a social security expansion proposal that was introduced by Elizabeth Warren The US House of Representatives has voted to push a $2 trillion…

House approves bill that would fund US government for a decade

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The EPA “plagiarized” parts of a social security expansion proposal that was introduced by Elizabeth Warren

The US House of Representatives has voted to push a $2 trillion (£1.7 trillion) bill through, and send it to the Senate.

It contains sweeping plans for US infrastructure and education, but one of the most controversial elements is a bill that would help fund the government for a decade.

The vote follows claims the bill “plagiarised” a proposal by Senator Elizabeth Warren to transform the government into a “citizen army”.

The Senate must now approve it to become law.

What is in the House bill?

This is not the most controversial part of the bill. The headline part is the long-awaited extension of unemployment benefits.

The package will provide a four-year extension to those federal benefits after nearly six years without a new plan, and will include a 50% hike in the maximum income threshold for aid.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption House Republican leaders refused to bring up the Senate’s more controversial version of the bill

The benefits bill passed the House 269-161 with bipartisan support.

The same bill includes $117bn (£84bn) in infrastructure spending, $153bn (£114bn) in education spending, and help for healthcare for the hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans whose territory’s infrastructure was badly damaged in last year’s Hurricane Maria.

The House’s version also includes a sweeping climate change bill.

What is its fate in the Senate?

The Senate is expected to take up the measure next.

The Republican majority appears likely to pass the bill, despite resistance from a small number of Republicans.

And Democrats, unlike the House, will not have the ability to pass amendments to the bill.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Peter Welch and Pat Toomey are some of the notable House Republicans not supporting the bill

This means that while the bill will receive extensive support in the House, the Senate will face significant opposition from many of its members.

Following the House vote, Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said: “We will reject this disaster.”

The White House has vowed to veto the bill unless it contains a key provision calling for a nearly 30% cut to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) budget and a rollback of other environmental programmes.

It does not have the votes to pass.

Senators can pass changes to it, if they are able to negotiate a compromise between the two chambers.

What will happen if this bill is signed into law?

Even without the controversial addition of the Pentagon funding plan, the bill will be the first bipartisan bill President Donald Trump signs into law.

It also represents a new start for bipartisanship in Washington, as Mr Trump and Democrats came together after months of often partisan and difficult relationships.

Mr Trump will most likely see the infrastructure and healthcare sections of the bill as winners.

The Senate bill and the House bill both include funds to help build $1.6bn (£1.1bn) of “tens of thousands” of homes for unaccompanied immigrant children, used by families fleeing violence in Central America.

What is the American dream?

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The bill aims to make it easier for Americans to build a home and pay their tuition

The American dream refers to the belief that anyone, regardless of their background, can get ahead.

Mr Trump has embraced the myth and mocked critics of the idea – who he claims believe it is a myth, rather than a fact – during his recent State of the Union address.

Among the plan’s aims is making it easier for Americans to build a home and pay their tuition.

It also includes a mechanism that allows working families to pay for child care and community college.

Leave a Comment