Florida governor Ron DeSantis signs bill limiting forced vaccinations

State’s new legislation limits only the use of the manufacturer’s stock of lead vaccine in children, not ‘bundled’ package of vaccines Florida governor Ron DeSantis on Wednesday signed a bill into law that he…

Florida governor Ron DeSantis signs bill limiting forced vaccinations

State’s new legislation limits only the use of the manufacturer’s stock of lead vaccine in children, not ‘bundled’ package of vaccines

Florida governor Ron DeSantis on Wednesday signed a bill into law that he said will stop forced vaccinations before a children even begins his school day.

Florida parents, too, told to stand up against mandatory vaccinations Read more

The bill, known as the “Brandon Parental Choice in Vaccination Bill” after its biggest sponsor, Republican state representative Matt Gaetz, limited the use of only the manufacturer’s stock of lead vaccine in children under 18 years old.

The provision came after parents in Gladeview, Florida, and other cities such as Gainesville, Florida, started using the threat of lawsuits to get their children’s parents to agree to vaccination waivers.

“Imagine having to take one grandparent, one spouse and one of your parents, aunts and uncles,” Gaetz told Reuters. “I don’t think that’s an easy conversation.”

Gaetz said the policy would level the playing field for parents who agree to vaccines and those who decline them. “If the state thinks they can force me to vaccinate my children, we’ll have a lawsuit to deal with,” he said.

Many parents are opting to undergo secondary doses of vaccines rather than the original ones, the Associated Press reported. When parents refuse to vaccinate, many providers require adults or children to be seen by a doctor before any vaccine may be administered. Once the child has been seen, and possibly those older adults who may have had their shots previously, any vaccinations must be prescribed by a physician, and the state may then inspect records to verify.

Advocates of forcing schoolchildren to receive vaccinations argue that measles and other preventable diseases are still prevalent around the world, despite efforts by parents who are attempting to inject their children with neurotoxins.

Scott Smith, the sheriff of Orange County, Florida, tried forcing a mother to vaccinate her child by filing an arrest warrant for her neglect of her duty as a parent. Like Gaetz, Smith argued that vaccination is “unproven and unproven” and should not be imposed on parents because they have to “seek the assistance of the state of Florida” when choosing not to vaccinate.

When the case reached trial, Smith couldn’t link the vaccine to the case’s extensive list of medical problems that allegedly occurred before the child was vaccinated. Furthermore, he was unable to tie the overall frequency of vaccination problems to the child’s decision not to get immunized. Despite the judge’s inability to pin the case on the parents’ vaccinations, the state attorney in that case chose not to pursue charges, instead settling it.

The case’s outcome did not push Gaetz to support a blanket state law, but he wanted to expand the prior liability limit to more parents. He sponsored the bill when it passed in the House, only to have it fail in the Senate. He sent the House version to the governor for his signature.

“They’re changing [defendants’] requirement to be financially liable for anything that might happen,” said Albert Leahy, executive director of the Health Care Association of Florida. “The evidence in support of vaccines is overwhelming.”

Leahy added that proposed legislation that would extend the standard “vaccine injury liability limit” to $1m for the children of any person who encounters complications, making his organization oppose it. He also warned against any efforts to raise the standard because it could actually hurt individuals and leave parents stuck with fines if they refuse to vaccinate their children.

Several federal judges have recently used the so-called “Justices theory” when throwing out personal belief exemptions.

“I don’t even know the judge,” Gaetz told Reuters. “I’m not attacking the judge. What I’m trying to do is make the best laws for the citizens of this state.”

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