Denver’s Heritage District, a Trend Continues to Revitalize Old Neighborhoods

Watch our report on Lakewood Avenue, which has evolved into a popular scene for people looking for a sense of community and a tranquil place to live. The area of Denver that two American…

Denver's Heritage District, a Trend Continues to Revitalize Old Neighborhoods

Watch our report on Lakewood Avenue, which has evolved into a popular scene for people looking for a sense of community and a tranquil place to live.

The area of Denver that two American Indians named Lakewood is experiencing a rebirth. Lakewood Avenue has been given a face lift. Newish homes and businesses are popping up, along with a new one called “Unitarian Universalist” to better reflect the eclectic atmosphere.

The name of the area is Lakewood Avenue. The area of Denver that two American Indians named Lakewood is experiencing a rebirth. Lakewood Avenue has been given a face lift. Newish homes and businesses are popping up, along with a new one called “Unitarian Universalist” to better reflect the eclectic atmosphere. The name of the area is Lakewood Avenue. The area of Denver that two American Indians named Lakewood is experiencing a rebirth.

Reporter, Frank Benson’s Fort Collins backyard is behind his 40-year old apartment complex, Lakewood Avenue, a hip place to live where the occupancy rate is more than 75 percent.

The place he lives is a sign of another boom happening in Denver: “In San Francisco, I lived there, it’s such a coastal area. Here it’s more of an inland area. It’s very urban,” says Benson.

He’s not the only one who sees a certain “old neighborhood feel” here in Denver. He’s seeing renters come and go from that neighborhood, making it sort of the drop-off for the big emerging part of the city: Golden Triangle.

Councilwoman Analilia Mejia lives here. She says the revitalization is happening despite Denver’s heavy walkability commitment and an ongoing effort to grow the city’s share of rental housing to 50 percent of all new construction.

“Here in Lakewood, we’re actually doing the opposite. We’re looking at demolishing older, vacant buildings. We’re also looking at building some new development, a higher density in the next 10 to 20 years,” says Mejia.

That’s not stopping many people looking for a more affordable place to live from those digs.

“I think they’re on the right path because they’re getting many more people moving here from other places. Right now, Denver is just catching on to what the rest of the country has been doing over the last 20 to 30 years,” says Benson.

One way to truly enjoy the change is to hang on to it. Now the city itself is changing.

“The city continues to grow and develop, but also help that same area grow and develop, so that it really takes advantage of its energy,” says Mejia.

With so many people moving here, they’re staying put. This area around the 37th Street Elevated will soon have a downtown feel for all who live there. You can look forward to that when the Arapahoe Transit Center is complete. It will bring light rail and commuter rail into the neighborhood.

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