Clarissa Eden dies: first female International Media Rights president

From the publisher: Clarissa Eden, made history as the first female president of international media rights, died from natural causes peacefully at home in Reading, United Kingdom on Monday, January 28. She was 101….

From the publisher:

Clarissa Eden, made history as the first female president of international media rights, died from natural causes peacefully at home in Reading, United Kingdom on Monday, January 28. She was 101.

Eden’s achievements were widely recognized, from her coup in republishing and translating Dr Johnson’s On the Origin of Species in both English and French, to her pioneering work in the field of gender studies. Most recently, she contributed to several seminal texts in gender studies. In 2012, she received the Women’s Media Center Margaret Thatcher Fellowship, which allows her to pursue her interest in trans and gender studies at University College London.

Reflecting on his years of friendship with her, Professor Robert Hayes of UCL, who with his wife Mary spoke at the occasion of the Women’s Media Center Fellowship grant, said: “I first met Clarissa in the mid-1970s, when our previous students from university and all of us were running an Amsterdam-based company distributing the Concord Press titles. I remember being very impressed by the speed with which she worked, and then hearing for the first time the recordings she made from Whitehorse-based tours she took in Europe in 1939.

Clarissa was a respected advocate for women and feminists worldwide, and among her many noteworthy achievements was becoming the first woman to be elected President of International Media Rights, taking office in 1988. Later, she became a member of the International Council of Globalisation, which advocates for free markets. Her inauguration speech, issued as a declaration, drew praise from Barack Obama.

Eden dedicated herself to raising awareness of the need for women to reach equality in the workplace, with a particular focus on improving working conditions for all women, particularly those who are female sex workers. She continued to advocate gender equality, publicly and privately, well into her later years.

She was also an active campaigner in environmental issues and was a member of the British Medical Association.

Before her death, she was serving her second term as a member of the British Select Committee on Women and Equalities.

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